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‘Stranger Things’ Pop-Up in Chicago Must Close Its Doors After Receiving a Hilarious Cease-and-Desist Letter

‘Stranger Things’ Pop-Up in Chicago Must Close Its Doors After Receiving a Hilarious Cease-and-Desist Letter



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Read Netflix’s funny yet serious letter here

Netflix knows how to send a cease-and-desist letter.

Fans who want to drink in the world of Stranger Things are going to have to hang Christmas lights and crack open beers in their own homes. Netflix has sent a popular pop-up bar in Chicago based on the hit series a cease-and-desist letter, claiming that the fittingly titled Upside Down bar is unauthorized.

According to Adweek, the Logan Square location of Emporium Arcade Bar received a note from Netflix’s legal department saying The Upside Down can stay open through its original closing date of Oct. But this isn’t your standard cease-and-desist letter. It’s filled with lighthearted references to the already-classic sci-fi show.

The letter reads:

“My walkie talkie is busted so I had to write this note instead. I heard you launched a Stranger Things pop-up bar at your Logan Square location. Look, I don’t want you to think I’m a total wastoid, and I love how much you guys love the show. (Just wait until you see Season 2!) But unless I’m living in the Upside Down, I don’t think we did a deal with you for this pop-up. You’re obviously creative types, so I’m sure you can appreciate that it’s important to us to have a say in how our fans encounter the worlds we build.

We’re not going to go full Dr. Brenner on you, but we ask that you please (1) not extend the pop-up beyond its 6 week run ending in September, and (2) reach out to us for permission if you plan to do something like this again. Let me know as soon as possible that you agree to these requests.

We love our fans more than anything, but you should know the Demogorgon is not always as forgiving. So please don’t make us call your mom.”

So, yeah, behind the references to monsters, hit ‘80s toys, and the man who tortured poor Eleven, there’s serious legal language in here. Netflix can still protect intellectual property rights without looking like a monster in the process thanks to this snappy note.

After opening its doors on Aug. 18, The Upside Down has quickly become one of the hottest bars in Chicago. In addition to Stranger Things-themed cocktails, the bar also features decorations that look straight out of your TV screens with the blinking Christmas lights, the spooky warehouse that Eleven once called home, and the Upside Down itself.


Published: 22:07 BST, 12 November 2018 | Updated: 22:22 BST, 12 November 2018

Increasingly, I feel dizzy and develop a headache when using my mobile phone for any length of time, yet when I talk on a landline I am absolutely fine. My doctor said it might be a new illness called electrohypersensitivity. Do you know anything about this? He said there seems to be increasing numbers of people with it.

This is a very interesting question. It is true that more and more people do believe that their health is suffering due to a hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields, including those caused by fluorescent lights, mobile or cordless phones, Wi-Fi, and power lines.

One UK study of 20,000 people found 4 per cent thought they were affected.

Yet I must make plain that electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it.

Did you know? Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it

These vary widely, but typically the skin is affected, with redness, tingling, and burning sensations.

Other symptoms include headache, fatigue, disturbed sleep, stress, palpitations, dizziness, nausea and gastroenterological symptoms.

In a sense it’s not a ‘new’ illness, as the potential health risks caused by radiation — whether from high-voltage powerlines, video display units, TVs, mobile phones, microwave ovens and other technologies — have been under discussion for some 30 years.


Published: 22:07 BST, 12 November 2018 | Updated: 22:22 BST, 12 November 2018

Increasingly, I feel dizzy and develop a headache when using my mobile phone for any length of time, yet when I talk on a landline I am absolutely fine. My doctor said it might be a new illness called electrohypersensitivity. Do you know anything about this? He said there seems to be increasing numbers of people with it.

This is a very interesting question. It is true that more and more people do believe that their health is suffering due to a hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields, including those caused by fluorescent lights, mobile or cordless phones, Wi-Fi, and power lines.

One UK study of 20,000 people found 4 per cent thought they were affected.

Yet I must make plain that electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it.

Did you know? Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it

These vary widely, but typically the skin is affected, with redness, tingling, and burning sensations.

Other symptoms include headache, fatigue, disturbed sleep, stress, palpitations, dizziness, nausea and gastroenterological symptoms.

In a sense it’s not a ‘new’ illness, as the potential health risks caused by radiation — whether from high-voltage powerlines, video display units, TVs, mobile phones, microwave ovens and other technologies — have been under discussion for some 30 years.


Published: 22:07 BST, 12 November 2018 | Updated: 22:22 BST, 12 November 2018

Increasingly, I feel dizzy and develop a headache when using my mobile phone for any length of time, yet when I talk on a landline I am absolutely fine. My doctor said it might be a new illness called electrohypersensitivity. Do you know anything about this? He said there seems to be increasing numbers of people with it.

This is a very interesting question. It is true that more and more people do believe that their health is suffering due to a hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields, including those caused by fluorescent lights, mobile or cordless phones, Wi-Fi, and power lines.

One UK study of 20,000 people found 4 per cent thought they were affected.

Yet I must make plain that electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it.

Did you know? Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it

These vary widely, but typically the skin is affected, with redness, tingling, and burning sensations.

Other symptoms include headache, fatigue, disturbed sleep, stress, palpitations, dizziness, nausea and gastroenterological symptoms.

In a sense it’s not a ‘new’ illness, as the potential health risks caused by radiation — whether from high-voltage powerlines, video display units, TVs, mobile phones, microwave ovens and other technologies — have been under discussion for some 30 years.


Published: 22:07 BST, 12 November 2018 | Updated: 22:22 BST, 12 November 2018

Increasingly, I feel dizzy and develop a headache when using my mobile phone for any length of time, yet when I talk on a landline I am absolutely fine. My doctor said it might be a new illness called electrohypersensitivity. Do you know anything about this? He said there seems to be increasing numbers of people with it.

This is a very interesting question. It is true that more and more people do believe that their health is suffering due to a hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields, including those caused by fluorescent lights, mobile or cordless phones, Wi-Fi, and power lines.

One UK study of 20,000 people found 4 per cent thought they were affected.

Yet I must make plain that electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it.

Did you know? Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it

These vary widely, but typically the skin is affected, with redness, tingling, and burning sensations.

Other symptoms include headache, fatigue, disturbed sleep, stress, palpitations, dizziness, nausea and gastroenterological symptoms.

In a sense it’s not a ‘new’ illness, as the potential health risks caused by radiation — whether from high-voltage powerlines, video display units, TVs, mobile phones, microwave ovens and other technologies — have been under discussion for some 30 years.


Published: 22:07 BST, 12 November 2018 | Updated: 22:22 BST, 12 November 2018

Increasingly, I feel dizzy and develop a headache when using my mobile phone for any length of time, yet when I talk on a landline I am absolutely fine. My doctor said it might be a new illness called electrohypersensitivity. Do you know anything about this? He said there seems to be increasing numbers of people with it.

This is a very interesting question. It is true that more and more people do believe that their health is suffering due to a hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields, including those caused by fluorescent lights, mobile or cordless phones, Wi-Fi, and power lines.

One UK study of 20,000 people found 4 per cent thought they were affected.

Yet I must make plain that electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it.

Did you know? Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it

These vary widely, but typically the skin is affected, with redness, tingling, and burning sensations.

Other symptoms include headache, fatigue, disturbed sleep, stress, palpitations, dizziness, nausea and gastroenterological symptoms.

In a sense it’s not a ‘new’ illness, as the potential health risks caused by radiation — whether from high-voltage powerlines, video display units, TVs, mobile phones, microwave ovens and other technologies — have been under discussion for some 30 years.


Published: 22:07 BST, 12 November 2018 | Updated: 22:22 BST, 12 November 2018

Increasingly, I feel dizzy and develop a headache when using my mobile phone for any length of time, yet when I talk on a landline I am absolutely fine. My doctor said it might be a new illness called electrohypersensitivity. Do you know anything about this? He said there seems to be increasing numbers of people with it.

This is a very interesting question. It is true that more and more people do believe that their health is suffering due to a hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields, including those caused by fluorescent lights, mobile or cordless phones, Wi-Fi, and power lines.

One UK study of 20,000 people found 4 per cent thought they were affected.

Yet I must make plain that electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it.

Did you know? Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it

These vary widely, but typically the skin is affected, with redness, tingling, and burning sensations.

Other symptoms include headache, fatigue, disturbed sleep, stress, palpitations, dizziness, nausea and gastroenterological symptoms.

In a sense it’s not a ‘new’ illness, as the potential health risks caused by radiation — whether from high-voltage powerlines, video display units, TVs, mobile phones, microwave ovens and other technologies — have been under discussion for some 30 years.


Published: 22:07 BST, 12 November 2018 | Updated: 22:22 BST, 12 November 2018

Increasingly, I feel dizzy and develop a headache when using my mobile phone for any length of time, yet when I talk on a landline I am absolutely fine. My doctor said it might be a new illness called electrohypersensitivity. Do you know anything about this? He said there seems to be increasing numbers of people with it.

This is a very interesting question. It is true that more and more people do believe that their health is suffering due to a hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields, including those caused by fluorescent lights, mobile or cordless phones, Wi-Fi, and power lines.

One UK study of 20,000 people found 4 per cent thought they were affected.

Yet I must make plain that electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it.

Did you know? Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it

These vary widely, but typically the skin is affected, with redness, tingling, and burning sensations.

Other symptoms include headache, fatigue, disturbed sleep, stress, palpitations, dizziness, nausea and gastroenterological symptoms.

In a sense it’s not a ‘new’ illness, as the potential health risks caused by radiation — whether from high-voltage powerlines, video display units, TVs, mobile phones, microwave ovens and other technologies — have been under discussion for some 30 years.


Published: 22:07 BST, 12 November 2018 | Updated: 22:22 BST, 12 November 2018

Increasingly, I feel dizzy and develop a headache when using my mobile phone for any length of time, yet when I talk on a landline I am absolutely fine. My doctor said it might be a new illness called electrohypersensitivity. Do you know anything about this? He said there seems to be increasing numbers of people with it.

This is a very interesting question. It is true that more and more people do believe that their health is suffering due to a hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields, including those caused by fluorescent lights, mobile or cordless phones, Wi-Fi, and power lines.

One UK study of 20,000 people found 4 per cent thought they were affected.

Yet I must make plain that electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it.

Did you know? Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it

These vary widely, but typically the skin is affected, with redness, tingling, and burning sensations.

Other symptoms include headache, fatigue, disturbed sleep, stress, palpitations, dizziness, nausea and gastroenterological symptoms.

In a sense it’s not a ‘new’ illness, as the potential health risks caused by radiation — whether from high-voltage powerlines, video display units, TVs, mobile phones, microwave ovens and other technologies — have been under discussion for some 30 years.


Published: 22:07 BST, 12 November 2018 | Updated: 22:22 BST, 12 November 2018

Increasingly, I feel dizzy and develop a headache when using my mobile phone for any length of time, yet when I talk on a landline I am absolutely fine. My doctor said it might be a new illness called electrohypersensitivity. Do you know anything about this? He said there seems to be increasing numbers of people with it.

This is a very interesting question. It is true that more and more people do believe that their health is suffering due to a hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields, including those caused by fluorescent lights, mobile or cordless phones, Wi-Fi, and power lines.

One UK study of 20,000 people found 4 per cent thought they were affected.

Yet I must make plain that electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it.

Did you know? Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it

These vary widely, but typically the skin is affected, with redness, tingling, and burning sensations.

Other symptoms include headache, fatigue, disturbed sleep, stress, palpitations, dizziness, nausea and gastroenterological symptoms.

In a sense it’s not a ‘new’ illness, as the potential health risks caused by radiation — whether from high-voltage powerlines, video display units, TVs, mobile phones, microwave ovens and other technologies — have been under discussion for some 30 years.


Published: 22:07 BST, 12 November 2018 | Updated: 22:22 BST, 12 November 2018

Increasingly, I feel dizzy and develop a headache when using my mobile phone for any length of time, yet when I talk on a landline I am absolutely fine. My doctor said it might be a new illness called electrohypersensitivity. Do you know anything about this? He said there seems to be increasing numbers of people with it.

This is a very interesting question. It is true that more and more people do believe that their health is suffering due to a hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields, including those caused by fluorescent lights, mobile or cordless phones, Wi-Fi, and power lines.

One UK study of 20,000 people found 4 per cent thought they were affected.

Yet I must make plain that electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it.

Did you know? Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is not a recognised medical diagnosis, nor is there yet any scientific explanation for the symptoms that some individuals attribute to it

These vary widely, but typically the skin is affected, with redness, tingling, and burning sensations.

Other symptoms include headache, fatigue, disturbed sleep, stress, palpitations, dizziness, nausea and gastroenterological symptoms.

In a sense it’s not a ‘new’ illness, as the potential health risks caused by radiation — whether from high-voltage powerlines, video display units, TVs, mobile phones, microwave ovens and other technologies — have been under discussion for some 30 years.