Latest recipes

The Last Supper

The Last Supper



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Death can be quite a scary thought; but thinking about it with food in mind makes things a little more bearable (and tasty). Here’s a quick run down on what six UT students chose as their exit meal.

Sana Vawda, Human Development and Family Sciences

Photo by Gabby Phi

“Does it have to be a meal or can it be a dessert?” Sana asked. I told her anything is fine as long as it’s a dish.

“Okay, I’m only saying this because I’m craving it right now. But I’d get the chocolate tuxedo cream cheesecake from Cheesecake Factory.”

Stephen Stacey, Civil Engineering

Photo by Gabby Phi

“I’d probably get a steak from Ruth’s Chris Steak House,” Stephen said.

“I feel like it’d be a really slow meal to eat so I can enjoy my last meal. And it’s really good.”

Teagan Gil, Neuroscience

Photo by Gabby Phi

“There’s this restaurant in San Antonio called Tai-Sun that I’ve been going to since I was a baby. I’d get the crab rangoon. It’s just delicious and comforting,” Teagan said.

Alif Musa, Petroleum Engineering

Photo by Gabby Phi

“I don’t want dessert before I die. That’d make me feel bad about myself. I’d probably get something spicy like buffalo wings,” Alif said. I asked if he had any specific restaurant in mind.

“Thai Spice,” Alif replied. “I go there too much.”

Joshua Nguyen, Biochemistry and Daphne Thammasila, Undeclared

Photo by Gabby Phi

“Well, I’d start off with sushi from Hokkaido as an appetizer,” Joshua said, “Then I’d get ‘granny’s eggs,’ this egg and beef dish my grandma used to make before she moved to California. Then I’d get the pork chop from Perry’s Steakhouse & Grille. I’ve only finished it twice in my life. Oh and with a side of my mom’s spaghetti and meatballs,” He continued, “For dessert, I’d get an apple pie from House of Pies. That’s it”

After hearing Joshua’s extensive meal, I asked Daphne what hers would be.

“I’d probably eat the crazy spider roll from Hokkaido, my mom’s beef stew and my dad’s rice soup. And an apple pie from House of Pies too,” Daphne said.

Joshua chimed in, still considering the question. “I’ll probably spend the whole day eating this. I mean, it’s my last meal. I don’t know if I’d last the whole day though.”

The post The Last Supper appeared first on Spoon University.


Food and the Last Supper: From the Divine to the Daily

The Last Supper is one of the most recognisable images in the world, and one of the most painted scenes in the history of art. Artists adapted faces, clothing, and settings to the places in which they lived and worked. And they put food on the table that was symbolic, recognisable, and acceptable for their audience. While wine and bread are the only sacramental necessities, some surprising foods ended up on the table around the world.

Undoubtedly, the most celebrated Last Supper painting is by Leonardo da Vinci. For the refectory of Santa Maria della Grazie in Milan, Leonardo painted a very realistic fresco with a table seen from a higher viewpoint than was typical of most Renaissance depictions of the subject. This allows more of the tabletop to be visible. On a well-ironed tablecloth we see bread, wine and plenty of fruit. A plate to our left contains about half a dozen whole fish. There is another plate on the right, which was illegible until a recent restoration. Researchers revealed the curious item on this plate: grilled eel garnished with orange slices. Eels could not have been served in the original supper, but they were a delicacy in Renaissance Italy, as mentioned in period cookbooks.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Supper, 1498, Fresco

The Last Supper became a popular scene during Renaissance for artists to showcase their skills. The painting of Paolo Veronese, commissioned for the monastery of San Giovanni e Paolo in Venice in 1562-3 (currently at the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice) is perhaps the most lavish renaissance banquet scene, with people, servants and wandering dogs. The number of people and items in this large canvas got so outrageous that the Inquisition put the painter on trial. Finally, Veronese had to change the name of the painting to avoid punishment. Besides a tremendous amount of people, such as a nose-bleeding servant, a jester with a parrot, and two German soldiers, Saint Peter to the right of Jesus carves a piece of lamb, like a noble Renaissance banquet carver trinciante would, while a cat peeks next to his feet under the table.

Paolo Veronese, The Feast in the House of Levi, 1563, oil on canvas

So, what would Christ and his apostles really have eaten? According to food history professor Ken Albala, Jesus ate more or less a Mediterranean diet, according to what was available in the Holy Land at the time: bread and wine were staples, olives were essential food, along with figs, dates and pomegranates, nuts, chickpeas, lentils, greens, cheese and perhaps a little lamb or goat meat. Whether Jesus drank wine or ate meat himself is inconclusive. Journalist Lauretta Colonnelli, the author of La tavola di Dio (The Table of God) writes that a Passover meal such as this would have included foods like bitter herbs (lettuce, wild chicory sprouts or celery), unleavened bread, a sauce of fruits and nuts called charoset, roasted lamb, and wine, most likely sweetened and flavoured.

Surprisingly, for a long time at the beginning of Christianity, the Last Supper was not illustrated at all. The first known depiction is on a 6th century mosaic from Ravenna, where we see Christ and the twelve apostles reclining around a low table, on which there are two very large fish on a plate surrounded by loaves of bread. This might have been the actual sitting arrangement of the Last Supper, but the austerity of the food seems more figurative than true, fish being the symbol of Christ.

Mosaic in Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo. Last Supper, Anonymous, 6th century

In medieval paintings we don’t see much detail of food. The obsession with sin did not allow artists to celebrate the meal. However, we often find one or two local food items on the Last Supper table, such as pretzels. The pretzel was a symbol of the holy trinity and eternal life, and an ideal Lenten food, being made of water, flour and salt. As such, they ended up in illuminated medieval manuscripts and paintings from Germany and northern Italy. For example, in a Bavarian Last Supper example from the 11th century made for the Abbey of St. Peter in Salzburg, there is a pretzel on the right side of table. Christ is seated in the middle, according to medieval banquet etiquette. Judas is identified with a bird near his mouth, representing betrayal. He is often seen on the other side of the table in medieval paintings, dipping his hand into a bowl, enacting the verse: “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me will betray me.”

Last Supper in a benedictional, Regensburg, about 1030-40, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig VII 1, fol. 38

Another Last Supper that stands out is by Marcos Zapata (1753) in the Cathedral of Cuzco in Peru. The spread on the table, besides bread and wine, includes chicha, a Peruvian fermented corn drink, and native potatoes, peppers, and corn. At the centre, in front of Christ, is a plate of guinea pig (cuy), an Andean staple and a sacrificial animal in Inca culture. All these enabled the local artist to make this scene more Peruvian. To top it all off, it is believed that Zapata painted Judas to resemble Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador responsible for the fall of the Inca Empire.

Guinea pig in Cuzco Cathedral, Peru, Marcos Zapata (1753)

If we are what our icons eat, what would a modern day Last Supper look like? Donuts for eternal life, Coca-Cola as the symbol of divine grace, and on a central platter a large pepperoni pizza divided in 12 slices, Judas reaching for the slice of Jesus? Or gluten-free bread rolls and a bottle of celebrity rosé. It really depends on the viewer, rather than the eater.


Food and the Last Supper: From the Divine to the Daily

The Last Supper is one of the most recognisable images in the world, and one of the most painted scenes in the history of art. Artists adapted faces, clothing, and settings to the places in which they lived and worked. And they put food on the table that was symbolic, recognisable, and acceptable for their audience. While wine and bread are the only sacramental necessities, some surprising foods ended up on the table around the world.

Undoubtedly, the most celebrated Last Supper painting is by Leonardo da Vinci. For the refectory of Santa Maria della Grazie in Milan, Leonardo painted a very realistic fresco with a table seen from a higher viewpoint than was typical of most Renaissance depictions of the subject. This allows more of the tabletop to be visible. On a well-ironed tablecloth we see bread, wine and plenty of fruit. A plate to our left contains about half a dozen whole fish. There is another plate on the right, which was illegible until a recent restoration. Researchers revealed the curious item on this plate: grilled eel garnished with orange slices. Eels could not have been served in the original supper, but they were a delicacy in Renaissance Italy, as mentioned in period cookbooks.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Supper, 1498, Fresco

The Last Supper became a popular scene during Renaissance for artists to showcase their skills. The painting of Paolo Veronese, commissioned for the monastery of San Giovanni e Paolo in Venice in 1562-3 (currently at the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice) is perhaps the most lavish renaissance banquet scene, with people, servants and wandering dogs. The number of people and items in this large canvas got so outrageous that the Inquisition put the painter on trial. Finally, Veronese had to change the name of the painting to avoid punishment. Besides a tremendous amount of people, such as a nose-bleeding servant, a jester with a parrot, and two German soldiers, Saint Peter to the right of Jesus carves a piece of lamb, like a noble Renaissance banquet carver trinciante would, while a cat peeks next to his feet under the table.

Paolo Veronese, The Feast in the House of Levi, 1563, oil on canvas

So, what would Christ and his apostles really have eaten? According to food history professor Ken Albala, Jesus ate more or less a Mediterranean diet, according to what was available in the Holy Land at the time: bread and wine were staples, olives were essential food, along with figs, dates and pomegranates, nuts, chickpeas, lentils, greens, cheese and perhaps a little lamb or goat meat. Whether Jesus drank wine or ate meat himself is inconclusive. Journalist Lauretta Colonnelli, the author of La tavola di Dio (The Table of God) writes that a Passover meal such as this would have included foods like bitter herbs (lettuce, wild chicory sprouts or celery), unleavened bread, a sauce of fruits and nuts called charoset, roasted lamb, and wine, most likely sweetened and flavoured.

Surprisingly, for a long time at the beginning of Christianity, the Last Supper was not illustrated at all. The first known depiction is on a 6th century mosaic from Ravenna, where we see Christ and the twelve apostles reclining around a low table, on which there are two very large fish on a plate surrounded by loaves of bread. This might have been the actual sitting arrangement of the Last Supper, but the austerity of the food seems more figurative than true, fish being the symbol of Christ.

Mosaic in Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo. Last Supper, Anonymous, 6th century

In medieval paintings we don’t see much detail of food. The obsession with sin did not allow artists to celebrate the meal. However, we often find one or two local food items on the Last Supper table, such as pretzels. The pretzel was a symbol of the holy trinity and eternal life, and an ideal Lenten food, being made of water, flour and salt. As such, they ended up in illuminated medieval manuscripts and paintings from Germany and northern Italy. For example, in a Bavarian Last Supper example from the 11th century made for the Abbey of St. Peter in Salzburg, there is a pretzel on the right side of table. Christ is seated in the middle, according to medieval banquet etiquette. Judas is identified with a bird near his mouth, representing betrayal. He is often seen on the other side of the table in medieval paintings, dipping his hand into a bowl, enacting the verse: “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me will betray me.”

Last Supper in a benedictional, Regensburg, about 1030-40, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig VII 1, fol. 38

Another Last Supper that stands out is by Marcos Zapata (1753) in the Cathedral of Cuzco in Peru. The spread on the table, besides bread and wine, includes chicha, a Peruvian fermented corn drink, and native potatoes, peppers, and corn. At the centre, in front of Christ, is a plate of guinea pig (cuy), an Andean staple and a sacrificial animal in Inca culture. All these enabled the local artist to make this scene more Peruvian. To top it all off, it is believed that Zapata painted Judas to resemble Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador responsible for the fall of the Inca Empire.

Guinea pig in Cuzco Cathedral, Peru, Marcos Zapata (1753)

If we are what our icons eat, what would a modern day Last Supper look like? Donuts for eternal life, Coca-Cola as the symbol of divine grace, and on a central platter a large pepperoni pizza divided in 12 slices, Judas reaching for the slice of Jesus? Or gluten-free bread rolls and a bottle of celebrity rosé. It really depends on the viewer, rather than the eater.


Food and the Last Supper: From the Divine to the Daily

The Last Supper is one of the most recognisable images in the world, and one of the most painted scenes in the history of art. Artists adapted faces, clothing, and settings to the places in which they lived and worked. And they put food on the table that was symbolic, recognisable, and acceptable for their audience. While wine and bread are the only sacramental necessities, some surprising foods ended up on the table around the world.

Undoubtedly, the most celebrated Last Supper painting is by Leonardo da Vinci. For the refectory of Santa Maria della Grazie in Milan, Leonardo painted a very realistic fresco with a table seen from a higher viewpoint than was typical of most Renaissance depictions of the subject. This allows more of the tabletop to be visible. On a well-ironed tablecloth we see bread, wine and plenty of fruit. A plate to our left contains about half a dozen whole fish. There is another plate on the right, which was illegible until a recent restoration. Researchers revealed the curious item on this plate: grilled eel garnished with orange slices. Eels could not have been served in the original supper, but they were a delicacy in Renaissance Italy, as mentioned in period cookbooks.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Supper, 1498, Fresco

The Last Supper became a popular scene during Renaissance for artists to showcase their skills. The painting of Paolo Veronese, commissioned for the monastery of San Giovanni e Paolo in Venice in 1562-3 (currently at the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice) is perhaps the most lavish renaissance banquet scene, with people, servants and wandering dogs. The number of people and items in this large canvas got so outrageous that the Inquisition put the painter on trial. Finally, Veronese had to change the name of the painting to avoid punishment. Besides a tremendous amount of people, such as a nose-bleeding servant, a jester with a parrot, and two German soldiers, Saint Peter to the right of Jesus carves a piece of lamb, like a noble Renaissance banquet carver trinciante would, while a cat peeks next to his feet under the table.

Paolo Veronese, The Feast in the House of Levi, 1563, oil on canvas

So, what would Christ and his apostles really have eaten? According to food history professor Ken Albala, Jesus ate more or less a Mediterranean diet, according to what was available in the Holy Land at the time: bread and wine were staples, olives were essential food, along with figs, dates and pomegranates, nuts, chickpeas, lentils, greens, cheese and perhaps a little lamb or goat meat. Whether Jesus drank wine or ate meat himself is inconclusive. Journalist Lauretta Colonnelli, the author of La tavola di Dio (The Table of God) writes that a Passover meal such as this would have included foods like bitter herbs (lettuce, wild chicory sprouts or celery), unleavened bread, a sauce of fruits and nuts called charoset, roasted lamb, and wine, most likely sweetened and flavoured.

Surprisingly, for a long time at the beginning of Christianity, the Last Supper was not illustrated at all. The first known depiction is on a 6th century mosaic from Ravenna, where we see Christ and the twelve apostles reclining around a low table, on which there are two very large fish on a plate surrounded by loaves of bread. This might have been the actual sitting arrangement of the Last Supper, but the austerity of the food seems more figurative than true, fish being the symbol of Christ.

Mosaic in Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo. Last Supper, Anonymous, 6th century

In medieval paintings we don’t see much detail of food. The obsession with sin did not allow artists to celebrate the meal. However, we often find one or two local food items on the Last Supper table, such as pretzels. The pretzel was a symbol of the holy trinity and eternal life, and an ideal Lenten food, being made of water, flour and salt. As such, they ended up in illuminated medieval manuscripts and paintings from Germany and northern Italy. For example, in a Bavarian Last Supper example from the 11th century made for the Abbey of St. Peter in Salzburg, there is a pretzel on the right side of table. Christ is seated in the middle, according to medieval banquet etiquette. Judas is identified with a bird near his mouth, representing betrayal. He is often seen on the other side of the table in medieval paintings, dipping his hand into a bowl, enacting the verse: “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me will betray me.”

Last Supper in a benedictional, Regensburg, about 1030-40, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig VII 1, fol. 38

Another Last Supper that stands out is by Marcos Zapata (1753) in the Cathedral of Cuzco in Peru. The spread on the table, besides bread and wine, includes chicha, a Peruvian fermented corn drink, and native potatoes, peppers, and corn. At the centre, in front of Christ, is a plate of guinea pig (cuy), an Andean staple and a sacrificial animal in Inca culture. All these enabled the local artist to make this scene more Peruvian. To top it all off, it is believed that Zapata painted Judas to resemble Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador responsible for the fall of the Inca Empire.

Guinea pig in Cuzco Cathedral, Peru, Marcos Zapata (1753)

If we are what our icons eat, what would a modern day Last Supper look like? Donuts for eternal life, Coca-Cola as the symbol of divine grace, and on a central platter a large pepperoni pizza divided in 12 slices, Judas reaching for the slice of Jesus? Or gluten-free bread rolls and a bottle of celebrity rosé. It really depends on the viewer, rather than the eater.


Food and the Last Supper: From the Divine to the Daily

The Last Supper is one of the most recognisable images in the world, and one of the most painted scenes in the history of art. Artists adapted faces, clothing, and settings to the places in which they lived and worked. And they put food on the table that was symbolic, recognisable, and acceptable for their audience. While wine and bread are the only sacramental necessities, some surprising foods ended up on the table around the world.

Undoubtedly, the most celebrated Last Supper painting is by Leonardo da Vinci. For the refectory of Santa Maria della Grazie in Milan, Leonardo painted a very realistic fresco with a table seen from a higher viewpoint than was typical of most Renaissance depictions of the subject. This allows more of the tabletop to be visible. On a well-ironed tablecloth we see bread, wine and plenty of fruit. A plate to our left contains about half a dozen whole fish. There is another plate on the right, which was illegible until a recent restoration. Researchers revealed the curious item on this plate: grilled eel garnished with orange slices. Eels could not have been served in the original supper, but they were a delicacy in Renaissance Italy, as mentioned in period cookbooks.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Supper, 1498, Fresco

The Last Supper became a popular scene during Renaissance for artists to showcase their skills. The painting of Paolo Veronese, commissioned for the monastery of San Giovanni e Paolo in Venice in 1562-3 (currently at the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice) is perhaps the most lavish renaissance banquet scene, with people, servants and wandering dogs. The number of people and items in this large canvas got so outrageous that the Inquisition put the painter on trial. Finally, Veronese had to change the name of the painting to avoid punishment. Besides a tremendous amount of people, such as a nose-bleeding servant, a jester with a parrot, and two German soldiers, Saint Peter to the right of Jesus carves a piece of lamb, like a noble Renaissance banquet carver trinciante would, while a cat peeks next to his feet under the table.

Paolo Veronese, The Feast in the House of Levi, 1563, oil on canvas

So, what would Christ and his apostles really have eaten? According to food history professor Ken Albala, Jesus ate more or less a Mediterranean diet, according to what was available in the Holy Land at the time: bread and wine were staples, olives were essential food, along with figs, dates and pomegranates, nuts, chickpeas, lentils, greens, cheese and perhaps a little lamb or goat meat. Whether Jesus drank wine or ate meat himself is inconclusive. Journalist Lauretta Colonnelli, the author of La tavola di Dio (The Table of God) writes that a Passover meal such as this would have included foods like bitter herbs (lettuce, wild chicory sprouts or celery), unleavened bread, a sauce of fruits and nuts called charoset, roasted lamb, and wine, most likely sweetened and flavoured.

Surprisingly, for a long time at the beginning of Christianity, the Last Supper was not illustrated at all. The first known depiction is on a 6th century mosaic from Ravenna, where we see Christ and the twelve apostles reclining around a low table, on which there are two very large fish on a plate surrounded by loaves of bread. This might have been the actual sitting arrangement of the Last Supper, but the austerity of the food seems more figurative than true, fish being the symbol of Christ.

Mosaic in Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo. Last Supper, Anonymous, 6th century

In medieval paintings we don’t see much detail of food. The obsession with sin did not allow artists to celebrate the meal. However, we often find one or two local food items on the Last Supper table, such as pretzels. The pretzel was a symbol of the holy trinity and eternal life, and an ideal Lenten food, being made of water, flour and salt. As such, they ended up in illuminated medieval manuscripts and paintings from Germany and northern Italy. For example, in a Bavarian Last Supper example from the 11th century made for the Abbey of St. Peter in Salzburg, there is a pretzel on the right side of table. Christ is seated in the middle, according to medieval banquet etiquette. Judas is identified with a bird near his mouth, representing betrayal. He is often seen on the other side of the table in medieval paintings, dipping his hand into a bowl, enacting the verse: “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me will betray me.”

Last Supper in a benedictional, Regensburg, about 1030-40, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig VII 1, fol. 38

Another Last Supper that stands out is by Marcos Zapata (1753) in the Cathedral of Cuzco in Peru. The spread on the table, besides bread and wine, includes chicha, a Peruvian fermented corn drink, and native potatoes, peppers, and corn. At the centre, in front of Christ, is a plate of guinea pig (cuy), an Andean staple and a sacrificial animal in Inca culture. All these enabled the local artist to make this scene more Peruvian. To top it all off, it is believed that Zapata painted Judas to resemble Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador responsible for the fall of the Inca Empire.

Guinea pig in Cuzco Cathedral, Peru, Marcos Zapata (1753)

If we are what our icons eat, what would a modern day Last Supper look like? Donuts for eternal life, Coca-Cola as the symbol of divine grace, and on a central platter a large pepperoni pizza divided in 12 slices, Judas reaching for the slice of Jesus? Or gluten-free bread rolls and a bottle of celebrity rosé. It really depends on the viewer, rather than the eater.


Food and the Last Supper: From the Divine to the Daily

The Last Supper is one of the most recognisable images in the world, and one of the most painted scenes in the history of art. Artists adapted faces, clothing, and settings to the places in which they lived and worked. And they put food on the table that was symbolic, recognisable, and acceptable for their audience. While wine and bread are the only sacramental necessities, some surprising foods ended up on the table around the world.

Undoubtedly, the most celebrated Last Supper painting is by Leonardo da Vinci. For the refectory of Santa Maria della Grazie in Milan, Leonardo painted a very realistic fresco with a table seen from a higher viewpoint than was typical of most Renaissance depictions of the subject. This allows more of the tabletop to be visible. On a well-ironed tablecloth we see bread, wine and plenty of fruit. A plate to our left contains about half a dozen whole fish. There is another plate on the right, which was illegible until a recent restoration. Researchers revealed the curious item on this plate: grilled eel garnished with orange slices. Eels could not have been served in the original supper, but they were a delicacy in Renaissance Italy, as mentioned in period cookbooks.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Supper, 1498, Fresco

The Last Supper became a popular scene during Renaissance for artists to showcase their skills. The painting of Paolo Veronese, commissioned for the monastery of San Giovanni e Paolo in Venice in 1562-3 (currently at the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice) is perhaps the most lavish renaissance banquet scene, with people, servants and wandering dogs. The number of people and items in this large canvas got so outrageous that the Inquisition put the painter on trial. Finally, Veronese had to change the name of the painting to avoid punishment. Besides a tremendous amount of people, such as a nose-bleeding servant, a jester with a parrot, and two German soldiers, Saint Peter to the right of Jesus carves a piece of lamb, like a noble Renaissance banquet carver trinciante would, while a cat peeks next to his feet under the table.

Paolo Veronese, The Feast in the House of Levi, 1563, oil on canvas

So, what would Christ and his apostles really have eaten? According to food history professor Ken Albala, Jesus ate more or less a Mediterranean diet, according to what was available in the Holy Land at the time: bread and wine were staples, olives were essential food, along with figs, dates and pomegranates, nuts, chickpeas, lentils, greens, cheese and perhaps a little lamb or goat meat. Whether Jesus drank wine or ate meat himself is inconclusive. Journalist Lauretta Colonnelli, the author of La tavola di Dio (The Table of God) writes that a Passover meal such as this would have included foods like bitter herbs (lettuce, wild chicory sprouts or celery), unleavened bread, a sauce of fruits and nuts called charoset, roasted lamb, and wine, most likely sweetened and flavoured.

Surprisingly, for a long time at the beginning of Christianity, the Last Supper was not illustrated at all. The first known depiction is on a 6th century mosaic from Ravenna, where we see Christ and the twelve apostles reclining around a low table, on which there are two very large fish on a plate surrounded by loaves of bread. This might have been the actual sitting arrangement of the Last Supper, but the austerity of the food seems more figurative than true, fish being the symbol of Christ.

Mosaic in Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo. Last Supper, Anonymous, 6th century

In medieval paintings we don’t see much detail of food. The obsession with sin did not allow artists to celebrate the meal. However, we often find one or two local food items on the Last Supper table, such as pretzels. The pretzel was a symbol of the holy trinity and eternal life, and an ideal Lenten food, being made of water, flour and salt. As such, they ended up in illuminated medieval manuscripts and paintings from Germany and northern Italy. For example, in a Bavarian Last Supper example from the 11th century made for the Abbey of St. Peter in Salzburg, there is a pretzel on the right side of table. Christ is seated in the middle, according to medieval banquet etiquette. Judas is identified with a bird near his mouth, representing betrayal. He is often seen on the other side of the table in medieval paintings, dipping his hand into a bowl, enacting the verse: “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me will betray me.”

Last Supper in a benedictional, Regensburg, about 1030-40, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig VII 1, fol. 38

Another Last Supper that stands out is by Marcos Zapata (1753) in the Cathedral of Cuzco in Peru. The spread on the table, besides bread and wine, includes chicha, a Peruvian fermented corn drink, and native potatoes, peppers, and corn. At the centre, in front of Christ, is a plate of guinea pig (cuy), an Andean staple and a sacrificial animal in Inca culture. All these enabled the local artist to make this scene more Peruvian. To top it all off, it is believed that Zapata painted Judas to resemble Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador responsible for the fall of the Inca Empire.

Guinea pig in Cuzco Cathedral, Peru, Marcos Zapata (1753)

If we are what our icons eat, what would a modern day Last Supper look like? Donuts for eternal life, Coca-Cola as the symbol of divine grace, and on a central platter a large pepperoni pizza divided in 12 slices, Judas reaching for the slice of Jesus? Or gluten-free bread rolls and a bottle of celebrity rosé. It really depends on the viewer, rather than the eater.


Food and the Last Supper: From the Divine to the Daily

The Last Supper is one of the most recognisable images in the world, and one of the most painted scenes in the history of art. Artists adapted faces, clothing, and settings to the places in which they lived and worked. And they put food on the table that was symbolic, recognisable, and acceptable for their audience. While wine and bread are the only sacramental necessities, some surprising foods ended up on the table around the world.

Undoubtedly, the most celebrated Last Supper painting is by Leonardo da Vinci. For the refectory of Santa Maria della Grazie in Milan, Leonardo painted a very realistic fresco with a table seen from a higher viewpoint than was typical of most Renaissance depictions of the subject. This allows more of the tabletop to be visible. On a well-ironed tablecloth we see bread, wine and plenty of fruit. A plate to our left contains about half a dozen whole fish. There is another plate on the right, which was illegible until a recent restoration. Researchers revealed the curious item on this plate: grilled eel garnished with orange slices. Eels could not have been served in the original supper, but they were a delicacy in Renaissance Italy, as mentioned in period cookbooks.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Supper, 1498, Fresco

The Last Supper became a popular scene during Renaissance for artists to showcase their skills. The painting of Paolo Veronese, commissioned for the monastery of San Giovanni e Paolo in Venice in 1562-3 (currently at the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice) is perhaps the most lavish renaissance banquet scene, with people, servants and wandering dogs. The number of people and items in this large canvas got so outrageous that the Inquisition put the painter on trial. Finally, Veronese had to change the name of the painting to avoid punishment. Besides a tremendous amount of people, such as a nose-bleeding servant, a jester with a parrot, and two German soldiers, Saint Peter to the right of Jesus carves a piece of lamb, like a noble Renaissance banquet carver trinciante would, while a cat peeks next to his feet under the table.

Paolo Veronese, The Feast in the House of Levi, 1563, oil on canvas

So, what would Christ and his apostles really have eaten? According to food history professor Ken Albala, Jesus ate more or less a Mediterranean diet, according to what was available in the Holy Land at the time: bread and wine were staples, olives were essential food, along with figs, dates and pomegranates, nuts, chickpeas, lentils, greens, cheese and perhaps a little lamb or goat meat. Whether Jesus drank wine or ate meat himself is inconclusive. Journalist Lauretta Colonnelli, the author of La tavola di Dio (The Table of God) writes that a Passover meal such as this would have included foods like bitter herbs (lettuce, wild chicory sprouts or celery), unleavened bread, a sauce of fruits and nuts called charoset, roasted lamb, and wine, most likely sweetened and flavoured.

Surprisingly, for a long time at the beginning of Christianity, the Last Supper was not illustrated at all. The first known depiction is on a 6th century mosaic from Ravenna, where we see Christ and the twelve apostles reclining around a low table, on which there are two very large fish on a plate surrounded by loaves of bread. This might have been the actual sitting arrangement of the Last Supper, but the austerity of the food seems more figurative than true, fish being the symbol of Christ.

Mosaic in Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo. Last Supper, Anonymous, 6th century

In medieval paintings we don’t see much detail of food. The obsession with sin did not allow artists to celebrate the meal. However, we often find one or two local food items on the Last Supper table, such as pretzels. The pretzel was a symbol of the holy trinity and eternal life, and an ideal Lenten food, being made of water, flour and salt. As such, they ended up in illuminated medieval manuscripts and paintings from Germany and northern Italy. For example, in a Bavarian Last Supper example from the 11th century made for the Abbey of St. Peter in Salzburg, there is a pretzel on the right side of table. Christ is seated in the middle, according to medieval banquet etiquette. Judas is identified with a bird near his mouth, representing betrayal. He is often seen on the other side of the table in medieval paintings, dipping his hand into a bowl, enacting the verse: “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me will betray me.”

Last Supper in a benedictional, Regensburg, about 1030-40, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig VII 1, fol. 38

Another Last Supper that stands out is by Marcos Zapata (1753) in the Cathedral of Cuzco in Peru. The spread on the table, besides bread and wine, includes chicha, a Peruvian fermented corn drink, and native potatoes, peppers, and corn. At the centre, in front of Christ, is a plate of guinea pig (cuy), an Andean staple and a sacrificial animal in Inca culture. All these enabled the local artist to make this scene more Peruvian. To top it all off, it is believed that Zapata painted Judas to resemble Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador responsible for the fall of the Inca Empire.

Guinea pig in Cuzco Cathedral, Peru, Marcos Zapata (1753)

If we are what our icons eat, what would a modern day Last Supper look like? Donuts for eternal life, Coca-Cola as the symbol of divine grace, and on a central platter a large pepperoni pizza divided in 12 slices, Judas reaching for the slice of Jesus? Or gluten-free bread rolls and a bottle of celebrity rosé. It really depends on the viewer, rather than the eater.


Food and the Last Supper: From the Divine to the Daily

The Last Supper is one of the most recognisable images in the world, and one of the most painted scenes in the history of art. Artists adapted faces, clothing, and settings to the places in which they lived and worked. And they put food on the table that was symbolic, recognisable, and acceptable for their audience. While wine and bread are the only sacramental necessities, some surprising foods ended up on the table around the world.

Undoubtedly, the most celebrated Last Supper painting is by Leonardo da Vinci. For the refectory of Santa Maria della Grazie in Milan, Leonardo painted a very realistic fresco with a table seen from a higher viewpoint than was typical of most Renaissance depictions of the subject. This allows more of the tabletop to be visible. On a well-ironed tablecloth we see bread, wine and plenty of fruit. A plate to our left contains about half a dozen whole fish. There is another plate on the right, which was illegible until a recent restoration. Researchers revealed the curious item on this plate: grilled eel garnished with orange slices. Eels could not have been served in the original supper, but they were a delicacy in Renaissance Italy, as mentioned in period cookbooks.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Supper, 1498, Fresco

The Last Supper became a popular scene during Renaissance for artists to showcase their skills. The painting of Paolo Veronese, commissioned for the monastery of San Giovanni e Paolo in Venice in 1562-3 (currently at the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice) is perhaps the most lavish renaissance banquet scene, with people, servants and wandering dogs. The number of people and items in this large canvas got so outrageous that the Inquisition put the painter on trial. Finally, Veronese had to change the name of the painting to avoid punishment. Besides a tremendous amount of people, such as a nose-bleeding servant, a jester with a parrot, and two German soldiers, Saint Peter to the right of Jesus carves a piece of lamb, like a noble Renaissance banquet carver trinciante would, while a cat peeks next to his feet under the table.

Paolo Veronese, The Feast in the House of Levi, 1563, oil on canvas

So, what would Christ and his apostles really have eaten? According to food history professor Ken Albala, Jesus ate more or less a Mediterranean diet, according to what was available in the Holy Land at the time: bread and wine were staples, olives were essential food, along with figs, dates and pomegranates, nuts, chickpeas, lentils, greens, cheese and perhaps a little lamb or goat meat. Whether Jesus drank wine or ate meat himself is inconclusive. Journalist Lauretta Colonnelli, the author of La tavola di Dio (The Table of God) writes that a Passover meal such as this would have included foods like bitter herbs (lettuce, wild chicory sprouts or celery), unleavened bread, a sauce of fruits and nuts called charoset, roasted lamb, and wine, most likely sweetened and flavoured.

Surprisingly, for a long time at the beginning of Christianity, the Last Supper was not illustrated at all. The first known depiction is on a 6th century mosaic from Ravenna, where we see Christ and the twelve apostles reclining around a low table, on which there are two very large fish on a plate surrounded by loaves of bread. This might have been the actual sitting arrangement of the Last Supper, but the austerity of the food seems more figurative than true, fish being the symbol of Christ.

Mosaic in Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo. Last Supper, Anonymous, 6th century

In medieval paintings we don’t see much detail of food. The obsession with sin did not allow artists to celebrate the meal. However, we often find one or two local food items on the Last Supper table, such as pretzels. The pretzel was a symbol of the holy trinity and eternal life, and an ideal Lenten food, being made of water, flour and salt. As such, they ended up in illuminated medieval manuscripts and paintings from Germany and northern Italy. For example, in a Bavarian Last Supper example from the 11th century made for the Abbey of St. Peter in Salzburg, there is a pretzel on the right side of table. Christ is seated in the middle, according to medieval banquet etiquette. Judas is identified with a bird near his mouth, representing betrayal. He is often seen on the other side of the table in medieval paintings, dipping his hand into a bowl, enacting the verse: “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me will betray me.”

Last Supper in a benedictional, Regensburg, about 1030-40, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig VII 1, fol. 38

Another Last Supper that stands out is by Marcos Zapata (1753) in the Cathedral of Cuzco in Peru. The spread on the table, besides bread and wine, includes chicha, a Peruvian fermented corn drink, and native potatoes, peppers, and corn. At the centre, in front of Christ, is a plate of guinea pig (cuy), an Andean staple and a sacrificial animal in Inca culture. All these enabled the local artist to make this scene more Peruvian. To top it all off, it is believed that Zapata painted Judas to resemble Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador responsible for the fall of the Inca Empire.

Guinea pig in Cuzco Cathedral, Peru, Marcos Zapata (1753)

If we are what our icons eat, what would a modern day Last Supper look like? Donuts for eternal life, Coca-Cola as the symbol of divine grace, and on a central platter a large pepperoni pizza divided in 12 slices, Judas reaching for the slice of Jesus? Or gluten-free bread rolls and a bottle of celebrity rosé. It really depends on the viewer, rather than the eater.


Food and the Last Supper: From the Divine to the Daily

The Last Supper is one of the most recognisable images in the world, and one of the most painted scenes in the history of art. Artists adapted faces, clothing, and settings to the places in which they lived and worked. And they put food on the table that was symbolic, recognisable, and acceptable for their audience. While wine and bread are the only sacramental necessities, some surprising foods ended up on the table around the world.

Undoubtedly, the most celebrated Last Supper painting is by Leonardo da Vinci. For the refectory of Santa Maria della Grazie in Milan, Leonardo painted a very realistic fresco with a table seen from a higher viewpoint than was typical of most Renaissance depictions of the subject. This allows more of the tabletop to be visible. On a well-ironed tablecloth we see bread, wine and plenty of fruit. A plate to our left contains about half a dozen whole fish. There is another plate on the right, which was illegible until a recent restoration. Researchers revealed the curious item on this plate: grilled eel garnished with orange slices. Eels could not have been served in the original supper, but they were a delicacy in Renaissance Italy, as mentioned in period cookbooks.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Supper, 1498, Fresco

The Last Supper became a popular scene during Renaissance for artists to showcase their skills. The painting of Paolo Veronese, commissioned for the monastery of San Giovanni e Paolo in Venice in 1562-3 (currently at the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice) is perhaps the most lavish renaissance banquet scene, with people, servants and wandering dogs. The number of people and items in this large canvas got so outrageous that the Inquisition put the painter on trial. Finally, Veronese had to change the name of the painting to avoid punishment. Besides a tremendous amount of people, such as a nose-bleeding servant, a jester with a parrot, and two German soldiers, Saint Peter to the right of Jesus carves a piece of lamb, like a noble Renaissance banquet carver trinciante would, while a cat peeks next to his feet under the table.

Paolo Veronese, The Feast in the House of Levi, 1563, oil on canvas

So, what would Christ and his apostles really have eaten? According to food history professor Ken Albala, Jesus ate more or less a Mediterranean diet, according to what was available in the Holy Land at the time: bread and wine were staples, olives were essential food, along with figs, dates and pomegranates, nuts, chickpeas, lentils, greens, cheese and perhaps a little lamb or goat meat. Whether Jesus drank wine or ate meat himself is inconclusive. Journalist Lauretta Colonnelli, the author of La tavola di Dio (The Table of God) writes that a Passover meal such as this would have included foods like bitter herbs (lettuce, wild chicory sprouts or celery), unleavened bread, a sauce of fruits and nuts called charoset, roasted lamb, and wine, most likely sweetened and flavoured.

Surprisingly, for a long time at the beginning of Christianity, the Last Supper was not illustrated at all. The first known depiction is on a 6th century mosaic from Ravenna, where we see Christ and the twelve apostles reclining around a low table, on which there are two very large fish on a plate surrounded by loaves of bread. This might have been the actual sitting arrangement of the Last Supper, but the austerity of the food seems more figurative than true, fish being the symbol of Christ.

Mosaic in Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo. Last Supper, Anonymous, 6th century

In medieval paintings we don’t see much detail of food. The obsession with sin did not allow artists to celebrate the meal. However, we often find one or two local food items on the Last Supper table, such as pretzels. The pretzel was a symbol of the holy trinity and eternal life, and an ideal Lenten food, being made of water, flour and salt. As such, they ended up in illuminated medieval manuscripts and paintings from Germany and northern Italy. For example, in a Bavarian Last Supper example from the 11th century made for the Abbey of St. Peter in Salzburg, there is a pretzel on the right side of table. Christ is seated in the middle, according to medieval banquet etiquette. Judas is identified with a bird near his mouth, representing betrayal. He is often seen on the other side of the table in medieval paintings, dipping his hand into a bowl, enacting the verse: “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me will betray me.”

Last Supper in a benedictional, Regensburg, about 1030-40, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig VII 1, fol. 38

Another Last Supper that stands out is by Marcos Zapata (1753) in the Cathedral of Cuzco in Peru. The spread on the table, besides bread and wine, includes chicha, a Peruvian fermented corn drink, and native potatoes, peppers, and corn. At the centre, in front of Christ, is a plate of guinea pig (cuy), an Andean staple and a sacrificial animal in Inca culture. All these enabled the local artist to make this scene more Peruvian. To top it all off, it is believed that Zapata painted Judas to resemble Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador responsible for the fall of the Inca Empire.

Guinea pig in Cuzco Cathedral, Peru, Marcos Zapata (1753)

If we are what our icons eat, what would a modern day Last Supper look like? Donuts for eternal life, Coca-Cola as the symbol of divine grace, and on a central platter a large pepperoni pizza divided in 12 slices, Judas reaching for the slice of Jesus? Or gluten-free bread rolls and a bottle of celebrity rosé. It really depends on the viewer, rather than the eater.


Food and the Last Supper: From the Divine to the Daily

The Last Supper is one of the most recognisable images in the world, and one of the most painted scenes in the history of art. Artists adapted faces, clothing, and settings to the places in which they lived and worked. And they put food on the table that was symbolic, recognisable, and acceptable for their audience. While wine and bread are the only sacramental necessities, some surprising foods ended up on the table around the world.

Undoubtedly, the most celebrated Last Supper painting is by Leonardo da Vinci. For the refectory of Santa Maria della Grazie in Milan, Leonardo painted a very realistic fresco with a table seen from a higher viewpoint than was typical of most Renaissance depictions of the subject. This allows more of the tabletop to be visible. On a well-ironed tablecloth we see bread, wine and plenty of fruit. A plate to our left contains about half a dozen whole fish. There is another plate on the right, which was illegible until a recent restoration. Researchers revealed the curious item on this plate: grilled eel garnished with orange slices. Eels could not have been served in the original supper, but they were a delicacy in Renaissance Italy, as mentioned in period cookbooks.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Supper, 1498, Fresco

The Last Supper became a popular scene during Renaissance for artists to showcase their skills. The painting of Paolo Veronese, commissioned for the monastery of San Giovanni e Paolo in Venice in 1562-3 (currently at the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice) is perhaps the most lavish renaissance banquet scene, with people, servants and wandering dogs. The number of people and items in this large canvas got so outrageous that the Inquisition put the painter on trial. Finally, Veronese had to change the name of the painting to avoid punishment. Besides a tremendous amount of people, such as a nose-bleeding servant, a jester with a parrot, and two German soldiers, Saint Peter to the right of Jesus carves a piece of lamb, like a noble Renaissance banquet carver trinciante would, while a cat peeks next to his feet under the table.

Paolo Veronese, The Feast in the House of Levi, 1563, oil on canvas

So, what would Christ and his apostles really have eaten? According to food history professor Ken Albala, Jesus ate more or less a Mediterranean diet, according to what was available in the Holy Land at the time: bread and wine were staples, olives were essential food, along with figs, dates and pomegranates, nuts, chickpeas, lentils, greens, cheese and perhaps a little lamb or goat meat. Whether Jesus drank wine or ate meat himself is inconclusive. Journalist Lauretta Colonnelli, the author of La tavola di Dio (The Table of God) writes that a Passover meal such as this would have included foods like bitter herbs (lettuce, wild chicory sprouts or celery), unleavened bread, a sauce of fruits and nuts called charoset, roasted lamb, and wine, most likely sweetened and flavoured.

Surprisingly, for a long time at the beginning of Christianity, the Last Supper was not illustrated at all. The first known depiction is on a 6th century mosaic from Ravenna, where we see Christ and the twelve apostles reclining around a low table, on which there are two very large fish on a plate surrounded by loaves of bread. This might have been the actual sitting arrangement of the Last Supper, but the austerity of the food seems more figurative than true, fish being the symbol of Christ.

Mosaic in Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo. Last Supper, Anonymous, 6th century

In medieval paintings we don’t see much detail of food. The obsession with sin did not allow artists to celebrate the meal. However, we often find one or two local food items on the Last Supper table, such as pretzels. The pretzel was a symbol of the holy trinity and eternal life, and an ideal Lenten food, being made of water, flour and salt. As such, they ended up in illuminated medieval manuscripts and paintings from Germany and northern Italy. For example, in a Bavarian Last Supper example from the 11th century made for the Abbey of St. Peter in Salzburg, there is a pretzel on the right side of table. Christ is seated in the middle, according to medieval banquet etiquette. Judas is identified with a bird near his mouth, representing betrayal. He is often seen on the other side of the table in medieval paintings, dipping his hand into a bowl, enacting the verse: “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me will betray me.”

Last Supper in a benedictional, Regensburg, about 1030-40, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig VII 1, fol. 38

Another Last Supper that stands out is by Marcos Zapata (1753) in the Cathedral of Cuzco in Peru. The spread on the table, besides bread and wine, includes chicha, a Peruvian fermented corn drink, and native potatoes, peppers, and corn. At the centre, in front of Christ, is a plate of guinea pig (cuy), an Andean staple and a sacrificial animal in Inca culture. All these enabled the local artist to make this scene more Peruvian. To top it all off, it is believed that Zapata painted Judas to resemble Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador responsible for the fall of the Inca Empire.

Guinea pig in Cuzco Cathedral, Peru, Marcos Zapata (1753)

If we are what our icons eat, what would a modern day Last Supper look like? Donuts for eternal life, Coca-Cola as the symbol of divine grace, and on a central platter a large pepperoni pizza divided in 12 slices, Judas reaching for the slice of Jesus? Or gluten-free bread rolls and a bottle of celebrity rosé. It really depends on the viewer, rather than the eater.


Food and the Last Supper: From the Divine to the Daily

The Last Supper is one of the most recognisable images in the world, and one of the most painted scenes in the history of art. Artists adapted faces, clothing, and settings to the places in which they lived and worked. And they put food on the table that was symbolic, recognisable, and acceptable for their audience. While wine and bread are the only sacramental necessities, some surprising foods ended up on the table around the world.

Undoubtedly, the most celebrated Last Supper painting is by Leonardo da Vinci. For the refectory of Santa Maria della Grazie in Milan, Leonardo painted a very realistic fresco with a table seen from a higher viewpoint than was typical of most Renaissance depictions of the subject. This allows more of the tabletop to be visible. On a well-ironed tablecloth we see bread, wine and plenty of fruit. A plate to our left contains about half a dozen whole fish. There is another plate on the right, which was illegible until a recent restoration. Researchers revealed the curious item on this plate: grilled eel garnished with orange slices. Eels could not have been served in the original supper, but they were a delicacy in Renaissance Italy, as mentioned in period cookbooks.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Supper, 1498, Fresco

The Last Supper became a popular scene during Renaissance for artists to showcase their skills. The painting of Paolo Veronese, commissioned for the monastery of San Giovanni e Paolo in Venice in 1562-3 (currently at the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice) is perhaps the most lavish renaissance banquet scene, with people, servants and wandering dogs. The number of people and items in this large canvas got so outrageous that the Inquisition put the painter on trial. Finally, Veronese had to change the name of the painting to avoid punishment. Besides a tremendous amount of people, such as a nose-bleeding servant, a jester with a parrot, and two German soldiers, Saint Peter to the right of Jesus carves a piece of lamb, like a noble Renaissance banquet carver trinciante would, while a cat peeks next to his feet under the table.

Paolo Veronese, The Feast in the House of Levi, 1563, oil on canvas

So, what would Christ and his apostles really have eaten? According to food history professor Ken Albala, Jesus ate more or less a Mediterranean diet, according to what was available in the Holy Land at the time: bread and wine were staples, olives were essential food, along with figs, dates and pomegranates, nuts, chickpeas, lentils, greens, cheese and perhaps a little lamb or goat meat. Whether Jesus drank wine or ate meat himself is inconclusive. Journalist Lauretta Colonnelli, the author of La tavola di Dio (The Table of God) writes that a Passover meal such as this would have included foods like bitter herbs (lettuce, wild chicory sprouts or celery), unleavened bread, a sauce of fruits and nuts called charoset, roasted lamb, and wine, most likely sweetened and flavoured.

Surprisingly, for a long time at the beginning of Christianity, the Last Supper was not illustrated at all. The first known depiction is on a 6th century mosaic from Ravenna, where we see Christ and the twelve apostles reclining around a low table, on which there are two very large fish on a plate surrounded by loaves of bread. This might have been the actual sitting arrangement of the Last Supper, but the austerity of the food seems more figurative than true, fish being the symbol of Christ.

Mosaic in Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo. Last Supper, Anonymous, 6th century

In medieval paintings we don’t see much detail of food. The obsession with sin did not allow artists to celebrate the meal. However, we often find one or two local food items on the Last Supper table, such as pretzels. The pretzel was a symbol of the holy trinity and eternal life, and an ideal Lenten food, being made of water, flour and salt. As such, they ended up in illuminated medieval manuscripts and paintings from Germany and northern Italy. For example, in a Bavarian Last Supper example from the 11th century made for the Abbey of St. Peter in Salzburg, there is a pretzel on the right side of table. Christ is seated in the middle, according to medieval banquet etiquette. Judas is identified with a bird near his mouth, representing betrayal. He is often seen on the other side of the table in medieval paintings, dipping his hand into a bowl, enacting the verse: “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me will betray me.”

Last Supper in a benedictional, Regensburg, about 1030-40, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig VII 1, fol. 38

Another Last Supper that stands out is by Marcos Zapata (1753) in the Cathedral of Cuzco in Peru. The spread on the table, besides bread and wine, includes chicha, a Peruvian fermented corn drink, and native potatoes, peppers, and corn. At the centre, in front of Christ, is a plate of guinea pig (cuy), an Andean staple and a sacrificial animal in Inca culture. All these enabled the local artist to make this scene more Peruvian. To top it all off, it is believed that Zapata painted Judas to resemble Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador responsible for the fall of the Inca Empire.

Guinea pig in Cuzco Cathedral, Peru, Marcos Zapata (1753)

If we are what our icons eat, what would a modern day Last Supper look like? Donuts for eternal life, Coca-Cola as the symbol of divine grace, and on a central platter a large pepperoni pizza divided in 12 slices, Judas reaching for the slice of Jesus? Or gluten-free bread rolls and a bottle of celebrity rosé. It really depends on the viewer, rather than the eater.


Watch the video: The Last Word With Lawrence ODonnell 80621 10PM. MSNBC Breaking News Today August 06, 2021 (August 2022).